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The Lincoln Memorial
The Lincoln Memorial is an American national monument built to honor the 16th President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln. It is located on the western end of the National Mall in Washington, D.C., across from the Washington Monument. Wikipedia
Address: 2 Lincoln Memorial Cir NW, Washington, DC 20037
Height: 98′
Opened: May 30, 1922
Area: 164 acres
Washington DC hosts many monuments built in tribute to some of the country’s greatest leaders. The Lincoln Memorial is one such structure.

The Lincoln Memorial stands at the west end of the National Mall as a neoclassical monument to the 16th President. The memorial, designed by Henry Bacon, after ancient Greek temples, stands 190 feet long, 119 feet wide, and almost 100 feet high. It is surrounded by a peristyle of 38 fluted Doric columns, one for each of the thirty-six states in the Union at the time of Lincoln’s death, and two columns in-antis at the entrance behind the colonnade. The north and south side chambers contain carved inscriptions of Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address and his Gettysburg Address. Lying between the north and south chambers is the central hall containing the solitary figure of Lincoln sitting in contemplation. The statue was carved in four years by the Piccirilli brothers under the supervision of the sculptor, Daniel Chester French. The statue of Lincoln is 19 feet high and weighs 175 tons. The original plan was for the statue to be only ten feet high, but this was changed so that the figure of Lincoln would not be dwarfed by the size of the chamber. A commission to plan a monument was first proposed in 1867, shortly after Lincoln’s death. The design for that plan called for six equestrian and 31 pedestrian statues of colossal size, with a 12-foot statue of Lincoln in the center. That project was never started for lack of funds. Congress approved the bill to construct this memorial in 1910. Construction began in 1914, and the memorial was opened to the public in 1922. The Memorial is visited by millions of visitors each year and is the site of many large public gatherings and protests. Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech to a crowd by the Lincoln Memorial in 1963. Damaged over the years by heavy visitation and environmental factors, the Lincoln Memorial is currently undergoing a major restoration.
CONSTRUCTION OF THE LINCOLN MEMORIAL AND SURROUNDING GROUNDS

On February 12, 1914, the Ground Breaking Ceremony took place. Within a year of that event, the foundation and base structure were quickly taking form.
Construction is moving along in January 1915.
The foundation construction was moving along in January 1915.
Another view of the foundation construction from January 1915.
Another view of the foundation construction from January 1915.
One year after the Ground Breaking ceremonies, the foundation was ready to receive the first cornerstone of the memorial. It was laid in place on Lincoln’s birthday February 12, 1915.

Laying the cornerstone for the Lincoln Memorial on Lincoln's birthday, February 12, 1915.
Laying the cornerstone for the Lincoln Memorial on Lincoln's birthday, February 12, 1915.
The next step was to build the cella (inner chamber of the memorial). This began to take shape by early 1916. It still did not have its now recognizable marble colonnade surrounding it.

By late 1916-17 the Doric colonnade and outer structure began to appear. When completed, the final size of the Memorial would be 201 feet 10 inches wide x 132 feet deep x 79 feet 10 inches high above the foundation.

Thirty-six fluted columns (each representing a state in the Union at the time of Lincoln’s death) plus two at the entrance each measure 7 feet 5 inches in diameter. The height of each column from floor to ceiling is 44 feet. Each column has 20 flutes.

The completed statue of Lincoln (c1943) with the Cotissoz inscription above. The inscription was carved by Ernest C. Bairstow.
The completed statue of Lincoln (c1943) with Mr. Royal Cotissoz's inscription above. The inscription was carved by Ernest C. Bairstow.
The grounds of the Lincoln Memorial slowly took shape. The Reflecting Pool does not exist as of yet.
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Construction on the marshlands dedicated for the Lincoln Memorial slowly takes shape. The Reflecting Pool doesn't exist at this point, and the area is used to hold materials and construction sheds.
Work well underway on the steps and surrounding exterior elements on the site.
Work well underway on the steps and surrounding exterior elements on the site. The steps lead down to the Reflecting Pool, which currently hasn't been built yet.
The Reflecting Pool was ready on the day of the Dedication Ceremonies on May 30, 1922.
The Reflecting Pool

THE DEDICATION CEREMONIES – MAY 30, 1922

The Dedication Ceremonies for the Lincoln Memorial were held on Tuesday, May 30, 1922. To begin, Dr. Robert Moton presented the keynote address. Dr. Moton was the second president of Tuskegee Institute in Alabama who had succeeded Booker T. Washington as president of the Institute. Chief Justice William Howard Taft officially turned over the memorial to President Warren Harding, who received it on behalf of the people of the United States. President Harding then spoke to the crowd. To conclude the ceremonies, Poet Edwin Markham read a revised version of his poem “Lincoln the Man of the People” . Robert Lincoln, who did not speak on this occasion, was a special guest and received a loud ovation from the crowd upon his arrival.
In attendance, but also not presenting were Vice President Calvin Coolidge (who would later become the 30th President of the United States), and Alice Roosevelt Longworth (Theodore Roosevelt’s eldest daughter).
The crowd gathered for the Lincoln Memorial Dedication Ceremonies on May 30, 1922.
The crowd gathered for the Lincoln Memorial Dedication Ceremonies on May 30, 1922.