WT

Website Title

 Humphrey Bogart
Humphrey DeForest Bogart  December 25, 1899 – January 14, 1957)  was an American screen actor whose performances in such iconic 1940s films noir as The Maltese Falcon, Casablanca, and The Big Sleep earned him the legacy of the cultural icon.[4][5][6] In 1999, the American Film Institute ranked Bogart as the greatest male star of Classic American cinema. Over his career, he received three Academy Award nominations for Best Actor, winning one (for The African Queen).
Bogart began acting in 1921 after a hitch in the U.S. Navy in World War I and little success in various jobs in finance and the production side of the theater. Gradually he became a regular in Broadway shows in the 1920s and 1930s.

When the stock market crash of 1929 reduced the demand for plays, Bogart turned to film. His first great success was as Duke Mantee in The Petrified Forest (1936), and this led to a period of typecasting as a gangster with films such as Angels with Dirty Faces (1938) and B-movies like The Return of Doctor X (1939).

Bogart's breakthrough as a leading man came in 1941 with High Sierra and The Maltese Falcon. The next year, his performance in Casablanca (1943; Oscar nomination) raised him to the peak of his profession and, at the same time, cemented his trademark film persona, that of the hard-boiled cynic who ultimately shows his noble side.

Other successes followed, including To Have and Have Not (1944), The Big Sleep (1946), Dark Passage (1947), and Key Largo (1948), all four with his wife Lauren Bacall; The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948); In a Lonely Place (1950); The African Queen (1951; Oscar won); Sabrina (1954); and The Caine Mutiny (1954; Oscar nomination). His last film was The Harder They Fall (1956). During a film career of almost 30 years, he appeared in 75 feature films.
Once, after signing a long-term deal with Warner Bros., Bogart had predicted with glee that his teeth and hair would fall out before the contract ended. By the mid-1950s, well established as an independent producer, the sometime actor's health was failing. In the wake of Santana Productions, he had formed a new company and had anxious plans for a film Melville Goodwin, U.S.A., in which he would play a general and Bacall a press magnate. However, his persistent cough and difficulty eating became too serious to ignore, and he dropped the project.

Bogart, a heavy smoker, and drinker had developed cancer of the esophagus. He almost never spoke of his failing health and refused to see a doctor until January 1956. A diagnosis was made several weeks later, but by then removal of his esophagus, two lymph nodes, and a rib on March 1, 1956, was too late to halt the disease, even with chemotherapy.

He underwent corrective surgery in November 1956 after cancer had spread. With time, he grew too weak to walk up and down stairs, valiantly fighting the pain yet still able to joke: "Put me in the dumbwaiter and I'll ride down to the first floor in style." It was then altered to accommodate his wheelchair.

Frank Sinatra was a frequent visitor, as were Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy. In an interview, Hepburn described the last time she and Tracy saw their dear friend, on January 13, 1957:

Spence patted him on the shoulder and said, "Goodnight, Bogie." Bogie turned his eyes to Spence very quietly and with a sweet smile covered Spence's hand with his own and said, "Goodbye, Spence." Spence's heart stood still. He understood.
Bogart fell into a coma and died in his bed the next day. He had just turned 57 twenty days prior and weighed only 80 pounds (36 kg). His simple funeral was held at All Saints Episcopal Church, with musical selections from favorite composers Johann Sebastian Bach and Claude Debussy.

The ceremony was attended by some of Hollywood's biggest stars, including Hepburn, Tracy, Judy Garland, David Niven, Ronald Reagan, James Mason, Bette Davis, Danny Kaye, Joan Fontaine, Marlene Dietrich, James Cagney, Errol Flynn, Gregory Peck and Gary Cooper, as well as Billy Wilder and Jack Warner. Bacall had asked Tracy to give the eulogy, but he was too upset, so John Huston spoke instead. He reminded the gathered mourners that while Bogart's life had ended far too soon, it had been a rich one:

Himself, he never took too seriously—his work most seriously. He regarded the somewhat gaudy figure of Bogart, the star, with an amused cynicism; Bogart, the actor, he held in deep respect ... In each of the fountains at Versailles there is a pike which keeps all the carp active; otherwise they would grow overfat and die. Bogie took rare delight in performing a similar duty in the fountains of Hollywood. His victims seldom bore him any malice, and when they did, not for long. His shafts were fashioned only to stick into the outer layer of complacency, and not to penetrate through to the regions of the spirit where real injuries are done ... He is quite irreplaceable. There will never be another like him.

The niche of Humphrey Bogart, in the Garden of Memory, Forest Lawn Glendale.
Bogart's cremated remains were interred in Forest Lawn Memorial Park Cemetery, Glendale, California in the Garden of Memory, Columbarium of Eternal Light, Garden Niche 647.[139] He was buried with a small, gold whistle once part of a charm bracelet he had given to Lauren Bacall before they married.

On it was inscribed an allusion to a line from their first movie together, where Bacall had said to him shortly after their first meeting: "You know how to whistle don't you Steve? You just put your lips together and blow". The inscription read: "If you want anything, just whistle.
The probate value of Bogart's estate was $910,146 gross and $737,668 net ($7.7 million and $6.2 million today).
Legacy and tributes